burnish
digital glitch
565 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

groundidblue
digital glitch
562 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

groundid
digital glitch
562 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

northern
digital glitch
562 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

pinkfold
digital glitch
750 x 711 pixels
©2021

 

pinkfold1
digital glitch
750 x 711 pixels
©2021

 

pinkfold2
digital glitch
750 x 711 pixels
©2021

 

pinkground
digital glitch
750 x 562 pixels
©2021

 

pinktit
digital glitch
559 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluetitsquared
digital glitch
559 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluetit1
digital glitch
559 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluetit3
digital glitch
559 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

grassfold
digital glitch
750 x 619 pixels
©2021

 

cylunder
digital glitch
562 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluec6
digital glitch
509 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluec8
digital glitch
500 x 781 pixels
©2021

 

bluec14
digital glitch
530 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluec15
digital glitch
500 x 754 pixels
©2021

 

bluec16
digital glitch
523 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluecigar
digital glitch
562 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluecigar1.4
digital glitch
677 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

bluecigar2.1
digital glitch
667 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

blueface
digital glitch
739 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

voice
digital glitch
511 x 750 pixels
©2021

 

ARTIST STATEMENT: FEMMEGLITCH

Intuitive. Sign. Deletion. Obliteration. Constructive. Beauty
These pieces are glitches (digital) using three different subjects or topics that are all interrelated: t-shirts appearing in social media ads, images of the sound of my voice, and images of my body. My work concerns the intersections of sexuality, voyeurism, performance, Capitalism, and gender more broadly. I am influenced by asemics and abstract expressionist women like Joan Mitchell and Helen Frankenthaler.

The glitch is not the environment of the thing, it is the thing itself. I am less interested in exhausting the definitions of asemic writing (if the glitch is ultimately denying meaning from a semantic form is arguable) and more interested in seeing the possibilities of the glitch. I wrangle the “data bending” on phone apps until I get the desired image. That is creative and productive. This does not impede, however, the obliteration of the original image.

Most of my glitches start with ads on my Facebook (on my phone) that offer new complexities when considering its form. I am now introducing Capitalism, data mining, privacy infringement, assumption, targeting, and an inextricable combination of those that can only begin to attack the implications of a thing. I screenshot the ads for t-shirts that appear in my feed (based on the above) that usually show “positive” messaging for and about women, or perceived “feminist” messaging. Glitch apps then layer, destroy, and rebuild what I have consumed. Then I can resist or subvert by taking ownership of the whole mess. I make it what I want it to look like.

I use glitches to break down patriarchal structures. I think of the glitch as a sex act. It is a dominant/submissive binary. There is intention in glitching that is beauty. We know it is not ugly. The ultimate infringement of the digital—our human mistake of knowing and understanding.

Femmeglitch: I have used this moniker or description that includes gender. I think identifying the gender in the act is claiming the social and cultural implications of oppressive systems and the glitching is bending those systems, often to their demise. This makes glitching an art form.

biographical note:
Kristine Snodgrass is an artist, poet, professor, curator, and publisher living in Tallahassee, Florida. She is the author most recently of American Apparell from AlienBuddha Press and Rather, from Contagion Press. The proud founder and curator of Women Asemic Artists & Visual Poets (WAAVe), Snodgrass searches to create an online space for women in the asemic and vispo communities to share work, offer support, and network. Her asemic and vispo work has been published in Utsanga (Italy), Slow Forward and featured in Asemic Front 2 (AF2), South Florida Poetry Journal, Voices de la Luna, Brave New Word, and Talking About Strawberries, and forthing coming in Street Cake. She is the art editor for SoFloPoJo. Snodgrass loves collaborating and is always searching for new projects with artists and poets. You can find some of her writing about collaboration at TRIVIA: Voices of Feminism. She is excited about her newest chapbook, zero-zero, poems in collaboration with Maureen Seaton. More about Kristine Snodgrass at kristinesnodgrass.com.

self-portrait
©2020

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